Abstracts

Skip to soundbites »

Invited speakers

Stefano Sacanna (NYU) (10:30 - 11:15)
Harnessing Coulombic Forces to Guide Colloidal Self-Assembly
No abstract provided.
Simone Ruggeri (WUR) (11:15 - 11:45)
Multimodal Nano-Chemical, -Mechanical and -Morphological Analysis of Soft and Heterogeneous Biomolecular systems
No abstract provided.
Daniel Tam (TUD) (13:30 - 14:00)
Title to be announced
The abstract will follow.
Shibo Zou (AMOLF) (14:00 - 14:15)
Can a soft actuator be a sensor?
No abstract provided.
Charley Schaeffer (York) (14:15 - 14:30)
Modelling the Flow-Induced Self-Assembly of Native Silk Proteins
Silk fibres have an out-of-equilibrium semi-crystalline structure that emerges in response to shear and extensional flow. This process of natural silk spinning requires orders of magnitude less energy input than for the industrial spinning of synthetic polymer fibres. By applying the sticky-reptation model to linear viscoelastic data of the silk solution, we discovered that the dynamical response of the disordered protein is akin to that of an associating entangled polymer [Macromolecules 2020]. To understand how this class of polymers responds to strong flow, we developed a coarse-grained (quasi-)single-chain model that describes the intermolecular reversible crosslinks in an effective environment. Through simulations, and supported by analytical approximations, we found that the stochastic opening and closing of reversible crosslinks leads to the emergence of highly disperse dynamical chain conformations [PRL 2021]. We found that the fraction of highly stretched chain segments, which are needed to nucleate crystals, is finely controlled and optimised by both the molecular design of the polymer and by the flow field [J. Rheol 2022]. We aim to exploit these new insights to improve the widely used process of industrial flow-induced crystallisation. Further, by studying protein dynamics in `membraneless organelles' we are exploring how different chemical-reaction mechanisms control the dynamics of macroscopic phenomena such as (viscoelastic) liquid-liquid phase separation.
Silke Henkes (UL) (15:30 - 16:00)
Modelling soft active materials from the bottom up
Soft materials, such as colloids or granular packings, and living materials like tissues or cytoskeletal networks share fundamental properties: They are made from mesoscale individual elements that produce disordered assemblies, and they are driven internally or externally, I will give an overview of my current research activities. On the biological side, this includes both particle and vertex-based models of epithelial cell sheets, with an emphasis on correctly modelling local activity and its elastic interaction with the material. On the soft side, I will talk about active materials on curved surfaces and their interesting topological properties.
Vincent Debets (TUe) (16:00 - 16:15)
Title to be announced
The abstract will follow.
Olfa D'Angelo (UvA + FAU) (16:15 - 16:30)
Title to be announced
The abstract will follow.

Soundbites